Muscle Resources
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7X7IZ_ubg4
Great animation of events at the neuromuscular junction
Only 3:19 minutes long
Created by publishing company Pearson / Benjamin Cummings 2009

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wa04qYsaps
Great animation of how excitation and contraction are coupled to eachother
Only 2:14 minutes long
Created by publishing company Pearson / Benjamin Cummings 2009

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ct8AbZn_A8A
Great animation of the crossbridge cycle.
Only 3:55 minutes long.
Created by publishing company Pearson / Benjamin Cummings 2009

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVuW560nRII
Great animation of the events of muscle contraction at the sarcomere level.
Only 3:33 minutes long.
Created by publishing company Pearson / Benjamin Cummings 2008



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzXVe4RS8-A&feature=related
(8:51 minutes long) Great youtube video about the neuromuscular junction and the motor unit. I just disagree with the implication of the narration that the dendrites are sensory and the axons are motor. My clarification: The dendrites receive input from other neurons (which can be sensory OR motor neurons) and the axon of a motor neuron carries a motor message (BUT the axon of a sensory neuron would carry a sensory message - not all axons are motor).



http://www.exrx.net/Lists/Directory.html
Here you will find a directory of muscles.
If you click on the name of a mucle listed here you will be taken to a picture of that muscle
The pictures look like simplified copies of drawings from Gray's anatomy
and they show only a part of the muscle while the origin and insertion are generally hidden behind surrounding muscles.
However it does include helpful text about origins, insertions, and actions

http://www.meddean.luc.edu/lumen/MedEd/GrossAnatomy/dissector/muscles/muscles.html
Loyola University Medical Education Network
Here you will find a huge list of muscles arranged alphabetically.
When you click on the name of any muscle you will see a picture of that muscle surrounded by information about its Origin, Insertion, Action, and Nerve supply.

http://www.ptcentral.com/muscles
The Hosford Muscle Tables: Skeletal Muscles of the Human Body
Here you will find information about the skeletal muscles of the human body.
Included is each muscle's origin, insertion, action, blood supply, and innervation.
Be sure to check out the Related Anatomy Links at the bottom of the page:
Bony Anatomy / Radiology AND Additional Medical Education Links & Resources ETC...

http://www.getbodysmart.com/ap/muscles/musclesystem.html
Here you can find great pictures of muscles that are superimposed on eachother in layers that you can peel away one at a time and add back one at a time.
Also their are animations for some of the muscles
showing the actions they enable a person to perform.

http://www.enature.com/articles/detail.asp?storyID=542
Choose Your Side: White Meat or Dark?
An explanation of how red and white muscle fibers differ in Turkeys vs Ducks.
(Understanding how differences in bird muscle fibers determine what parts of the birds are red meat or white meat might help you remember the differences in human muscle white and red fibers.)


Sadly, the following sites are no longer available
or are difficult to see clearly

http://entochem.tamu.edu/MuscleStrucContractswf/index.html
This is a great site for understanding the molecular structure of the sarcomere.
You can see fabulous animations of the interactions between actin & myosin created by professor Larry Keeley.
Unfortunately as of March 2013 (or earlier) the original animations which were easy to see have been replaced with sample versions that have a superimposed static worded screen that makes it hard to see the underlying images. I guess that's because the creator wants to encourage professors to buy the cleaner version and compensate him for his hard work rather than using the internet version for free. It means that students can no longer see the clean version on their own by browsing the internet.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RmQzIS9IGUE
(9:18 minutes long) This youtube video shows both the structure of the muscle cell and the sarcomere and also the molecular events that cause sarcomere shortening. It is a nice and clean version with superimposed static worder message - but it is the version for insects not humans. However at the sarcomere level the action is exactly the same.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Avv94fAPNp8
(3:57 minutes long) A youtube version of one portion of the animation above for invertebrates. This is primarily about the details of actin and myosin crosslinking and ATP usage by myosin. It is a small portion of the longer youtube video above.
NOTE: The molecular events at the sarcomere level are the same in vertebrates and invertebrates but the interaction between neuron and muscle cell is a little different.
An invertebrate muscle cell may have multiple contact points between one neuron and one muscle cell - whereas - a vertebrate muscle cell and it's supplying neuron will only have one contact or neuromuscular junction.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kFmbrRJq4w
(2:59 minutes long) I like the first minute of the animation where it shows the sliding of thick and thin filaments past eachother and the shortening of the sarcomere - I do not like the rest of the video which I think is misleading about the role of ATP and ADP.

http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/matthews/myosin.html
(interactive) This is another nice animation - this one focuses on the muscle action potential entering the T-tubules and causing the SR to release Ca2+ which then interacts with troponin and tropomyosin complex on the thin filaments and allows myosin heads (using ATP) to interact with actin.
You have to click on some arrows to activate this animation.

http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/matthews/nmj.html
(interactive) This animation focuses on events at the neuromuscular junction.
You have to click on a lightning bolt type image to activate this animation.

http://courses.washington.edu/hubio553/atlas/content.html
Here you will find a musculoskeletal Atlas.
The muscles of various regions of the body are listed
and when you click on a muscle name you will come to a very nice picture of it.
The picture shows only the muscle in question with a clear view of its entire extent.
There are also pictures of joints and various features of joints.
The pictures at this site are not accompanied by text about origins, insertions or actions
http://www.rad.washington.edu/atlas
UPPER EXTREMITY Here you will find flashcards on muscles with origins, insertions and actions
http://www.rad.washington.edu/atlas2
LOWER EXTREMITY Here you will find flashcards on muscles with origins, insertion and actions
http://courses.washington.edu/hubio553/modules.html
Other resources from the University of Washington for their musculoskeletal core course


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